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BDLI

Space Pavilion ILA

We deliberately avoided comparisons with the darkness of outer space for the Space Pavilion and opted instead for a bright and light design that combined a high-tech feel with an inviting atmosphere.

Hosted by the partners ESA, BMWi, DLR, and BDLI, the Space Pavilion has always been one of the major attractions for the visitors to the International Aerospace Exhibition in Berlin. Its task is to demonstrate the importance and value of space travel for society in an informative and emotional approach. As at previous ILAs, the focus was on the value of satellite-based earth observation and communicating its importance to the general public and decision-makers from the fields of politics, research and the economy.

facts and fiction, cosmonauts for top-class live communication, were commissioned for the second time running to design and create the Space Pavilion. The 2010 Pavilion had already been a great success and was awarded several prizes. However, this was no reason for us to rest on our laurels and, for the 2012 model, we set new coordinates by designing a radially arranged structure over a surface area of more than 1,500 m².

The obtuse angles of the walls were evocative of the modules of the space station ISS and the former Spacelab. They also served as projection screens for graphics, photographs and texts while showcases, pedestals for exhibits and interactive stations, were integrated into the inclined surfaces.

The unusual layout enabled the visitors to wander between the five thematic rooms -  “Exploring the Universe”, “Exploring the Solar System“, “Exploring the Earth“, “Communication and Navigation” and “Launchers” – and had the feel of walking through a space station.

One of the most photographed motifs at the ILA was the five-metre-high iceberg at the centre of the pavilion which gradually melted away over the course of the event providing a stark reminder of climate change and the impact of global warming. Several models of research satellites hovered above the iceberg, illustrating the pivotal role of satellite-based observation in obtaining scientific evidence for this global phenomenon.

The Space Pavilion 2012 proved to be an absolute all-rounder, with its thematic rooms, a large auditorium and a prestigious VIP lounge with separate conference rooms. The real highlight, in the literal sense of the word, was the visitors’ terrace, which provided a comfortable vantage point and excellent view of the airfield and the fascinating air shows.

BDLI

Space Pavilion ILA

We deliberately avoided comparisons with the darkness of outer space for the Space Pavilion and opted instead for a bright and light design that combined a high-tech feel with an inviting atmosphere.

Hosted by the partners ESA, BMWi, DLR, and BDLI, the Space Pavilion has always been one of the major attractions for the visitors to the International Aerospace Exhibition in Berlin. Its task is to demonstrate the importance and value of space travel for society in an informative and emotional approach. As at previous ILAs, the focus was on the value of satellite-based earth observation and communicating its importance to the general public and decision-makers from the fields of politics, research and the economy.

facts and fiction, cosmonauts for top-class live communication, were commissioned for the second time running to design and create the Space Pavilion. The 2010 Pavilion had already been a great success and was awarded several prizes. However, this was no reason for us to rest on our laurels and, for the 2012 model, we set new coordinates by designing a radially arranged structure over a surface area of more than 1,500 m².

The obtuse angles of the walls were evocative of the modules of the space station ISS and the former Spacelab. They also served as projection screens for graphics, photographs and texts while showcases, pedestals for exhibits and interactive stations, were integrated into the inclined surfaces.

The unusual layout enabled the visitors to wander between the five thematic rooms -  “Exploring the Universe”, “Exploring the Solar System“, “Exploring the Earth“, “Communication and Navigation” and “Launchers” – and had the feel of walking through a space station.

One of the most photographed motifs at the ILA was the five-metre-high iceberg at the centre of the pavilion which gradually melted away over the course of the event providing a stark reminder of climate change and the impact of global warming. Several models of research satellites hovered above the iceberg, illustrating the pivotal role of satellite-based observation in obtaining scientific evidence for this global phenomenon.

The Space Pavilion 2012 proved to be an absolute all-rounder, with its thematic rooms, a large auditorium and a prestigious VIP lounge with separate conference rooms. The real highlight, in the literal sense of the word, was the visitors’ terrace, which provided a comfortable vantage point and excellent view of the airfield and the fascinating air shows.